Go to: Main Content Go to: Navigation

London Transport Museum


using the site

Poster

« Previous | Record 1 of 1 | Next»

Dorking, by Walter E Spradbery, 1929

Show related records and themes

Related records:

No related records found

Related themes:

Beyond the city

Expand Theme infomation Expand Theme information

Leisure travel into the area now known as Greater London (and beyond) was promoted to increase revenue during off-peak periods. For similar commercial reasons, commuters were encouraged to live further out from the city in the new suburbs. Posters advertising days out by tube, bus or tram, were prominently displayed at station entrances and on the vehicles themselves. They include some of the most attractive and evocative posters produced by the Underground/London Transport.
Show all records with Beyond the city theme

Day trips

Expand Sub-theme infomation Expand Theme information

Posters advertising days out by bus, tram and tube were originally printed to fill empty advertising space. They soon became important in their own right as a way of filling empty seats outside rush hour. Trips to the country by Green Line coaches or tube were particularly popular, with attractive publicity promoting different seasons of the year.These posters played an important part in establishing the reputations of artists such as Edward McKnight Kauffer and Walter Spradbery.
Show all records with Day trips theme


Suburbs

Expand Sub-theme infomation Expand Theme information

Interwar London witnessed an unprecedented housing boom, fuelled in part by the expansion of the tube system. Following the earlier success of the Golders Green extension, new suburbs were vigorously promoted by the Underground. An even more ambitious policy of suburban development, known as Metro-land, was pursued by the Metropolitan Railway in north west London. Both companies used posters to sell the ideal of a better life in semi-rural surroundings, connected to the city by fast and reliable electric trains.
Show all records with Suburbs theme


Navigation

You are here: