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Windsor, by Charles Ernest Cundall, 1927

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Open air London

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Londoners are very fortunate in having a large number of green open spaces, where they can escape the hustle and bustle of city life. Many of these were the former grounds of large houses or royal parks, whilst others were specially created as London expanded. The River Thames also offers Londoners a variety of day trips. Further outdoor attractions include London's public sculpture and historic sites like Highgate Cemetery. All these open air destinations have been promoted by London Transport posters.
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The Thames

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The River Thames has always offered Londoners a variety of day trip destinations. London Transport posters have subsequently marketed the river in a number of ways. The depiction of a bustling port celebrates the river's historic importance as an artery and hive of industry and commerce. Picturesque scenes have publicised the river's more tranquil reaches and historic sites. Recent posters, depicting the South Bank, have promoted the Thames as a site for culture and entertainment.
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From its first pictorial poster in 1908, the Underground and then London Transport have promoted sightseeing in the capital. Posters encouraged visitors and Londoners alike to either take a conducted tour or to explore the city themselves. Well known landmarks such as Nelson's Column and Buckingham Palace featured the most frequently, although lesser known places of interest were also publicised. Many posters focused on a specific sight, others simply encouraged visitors to 'See London by coach' or 'See London in summer'. Green line coach and country bus services allowed sightseeing to extend beyond the city.
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Royal buildings & palaces

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The Tower of London and Buckingham Palace were the most popular royal buildings to appear on sightseeing posters. However, lesser known sights such as St James's Palace and Kensington Palace also featured. Travel to royal buildings just outside London, in particular Windsor Castle and Hampton Court, was also promoted by coach, bus or tram.
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